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hoss 30 ( +1 | -1 )
NAJDORF SICILIAN CAN ANYONE HELP W/ THE BLACK PIECES?
I BOUGHT THE WALTER BROWNE PLAY THE SICILIAN TAPES AND NOBODY PLAYS ANY OF THOSE LINES AGAINST ME. I HAVE BEEN BRUTILIZED EVERY TIME I'VE PLAYED IT SO FAR. BUT, BECAUSE OF MY INVESTMENT I REALLY WOULD LIKE TO MAKE IT WORK

HOSS 1600
caldazar 139 ( +1 | -1 )
That's the Sicilian for you. There are so many different lines and different setups, to say nothing of possible transpositions, that you really need to study large amounts of theory to make it all work. To top it all off, you're choosing one of the most complicated Sicilian structures in the Najdorf as your main weapon.

Just glancing at your games, it looks like the opening isn't really your problem, though; it looks like you're being seriously outplayed tactically. I would seriously consider forgetting about openings entirely and just play very simple openings to improve your tactical skill. Then, you can gradually incorporate more complex opening systems into your game over time, eventually incorporating the most complex Sicilian structures into your play if you should decide to go that route.

If you really like the Sicilian style of play and insist on playing it right from the start, you could always start off with the simpler (relatively speaking) Sicilians such as the Taimanov (1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6) or the Kan (1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6). But even then you'd still have to know how to handle the various Closed Sicilians, the Grand Prix Attack, the Alapin Sicilians, and a small handful of offbeat White setups. Quite a lot of studying to do if you have to study all that and work on tactics at the same time.
chris21 16 ( +1 | -1 )
I'd like to take this opportunity to ask a sicillian related question:)

Would 1e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bc4 e6 be a Nadjorf with e6, or a schevenningen with a6?

Thanks for any help.
caldazar 31 ( +1 | -1 )
Either; there's very little distinction since ...a6 is played in Scheveningen systems rather regularly anyway. The basic idea of using the Najdorf move order to get into the Schev is to avoid the Keres Attack. The drawback, of course, is that you actually have to know how to play the Najdorf.
atrifix 30 ( +1 | -1 )
6. Bc4 usually remains in Najdorf territory, however, there are plenty of opportunities to transpose to a Scheveningen--or even a Sozin if Black plays ...Nc6. And the Najdorf move order doesn't only avoid the Keres Attack, it also opens up the possibility of an immediate ...e7-e5 (normally takes two moves in the Scheveningen).
chris21 5 ( +1 | -1 )
How does a6 prevent g5 (Keres attack)?

Thanks.
caldazar 90 ( +1 | -1 )
Well, the Keres Attack proper is 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 6. g4. If Black plays a Najdorf move order to try to get into the Scheveningen with 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6, some of White's tries (here a just a few):

6. Bc4 e6 ducks the Keres Attack since 7. g4? b5 (or 7... Nxe4 8. Nxe4 d5)

6. Be2 e6 and again no Keres Attack since 7. g4? d5

6. Be3 e6 and if now 7. g4 e5!, something Black can't do in the Scheveningen; something like this normally doesn't work too well due to a response of Bb5+, but here b5 is covered.

6. f4 e6 7. g4 e5! (same theme) 8. Nf5 (8.fxe5? Nxg4)

6. Bg5 e6 is one of the main branches of the Najdorf (Poisoned Pawn, Polugaevsky, ...Be7 main line, etc...); 7. g4 here is just silly and pointless.

There are of course a whole bunch of 6th moves for White, and playing ...e6 is not necessarily best against all of them (even against the above moves), but this sort of shows how Black can get into a Scheveningen position if he wants to without having to deal directly with the Keres Attack.
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chris21 2 ( +1 | -1 )
Thanks caldazar:)